Our Advisors

We are grateful for the support of many business owners and advisors without whom, we could not do the work that we do.

2013-01-29 21.37.53Charlotte Brandin served as Executive Director for World Childhood Foundation USA 2002-2014 (childhood-usa.org). In her role, Ms. Brandin was responsible for all operations, including fundraising, financial management, and communications. Moreover, she managed the US project portfolio (13 projects annually) including M&E to provide risk funding to projects that focused on prevention of child sexual abuse and exploitation.

Prior to Childhood, Ms. Brandin worked in different capacities including Assistant Center Director, at Planned Parenthood SF/Bay Area, and after moving to New Jersey in 1996, served on the Advisory Board of NJ Legal Services. She is also a founding member of the national “Welfare Made A Difference Campaign”, working for the reauthorization of TANF.

Currently, Ms. Brandin is a Board member of Charity Rating, a Swedish charity ‘watchdog’ agency. Ms. Brandin has and continues to serve in advisory capacities of several charities, both in Sweden and the US.

Before moving to San Francisco from Sweden in 1989, Ms. Brandin pursued undergraduate studies in Nordic Languages and Sociology at Lund University, Sweden, as well as doctoral studies in sociology, including teaching online classes; followed by attending UC Berkeley, CA, studying sociology, and jurisprudence and social policy.

Ms. Brandin lives in Far Hills, NJ, and is the mother of two daughters, 17 and 20 years old.

 

balagopalGopalan Balagopal is the UNICEF Representative to the DPR Korea and has been based in Pyongyang since 2006. He leads UNICEF’s team of 10 international professionals and 25 national staff who promote critical interventions that help women and children.

Gopalan Balagopal’s other positions have included Senior Advisor, Child Protection, UNICEF Headquarters, New York (2000–2006) where he was responsible for supporting UNICEF’s work to protect children from violence, abuse and exploitation. He also led UNICEF initiatives into promoting registration of births, working with global partners including PLAN International and others organizations, and was UNICEF’s focal point for the Second World Congress Against Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children at Yokohama (2001) and the Secretary General’s Study on Violence Against Children (2005-2006). He also served as the Chief of Child Protection, UNICEF Bangladesh, Dhaka (1996–2000) where he established and led the Child Protection Unit; worked with the government and NGO partners in identifying a program that protects children from all forms of exploitation, violence and abuse; helped establish an Acid Survivors Forum for victims of acid throwing on women and started action focusing on young males to stop violence against women and girls; and raised awareness on the importance of registration of births and evolved means to support and sustain birth registration. Other positions have included Project Officer Child Rights, UNICEF India, New Delhi (1994–1996), Member of the Indian Administrative Service (1974–1994), and an executive position at Travancore Ltd in India (1969–1974).

Gopalan Balagopal holds a Master of Public Administration from the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University (1988-1989) and has published articles on development issues.

 

bio_bunkersKelley McCreery Bunkers has worked as a consultant to international NGOs and UN agencies for over a decade. Most recently she has consulted with Save the Children US, Family Health International in Ethiopia, UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Office, and UNICEF Guatemala on issues addressing orphan and vulnerable children. From 2005 to 2008 she consulted with UNICEF in Guatemala on foster care issues and led efforts to ensure ratification of The Hague Convention and passage of the Adoption Law for Guatemala. Between 1999 and 2005, Ms. Bunkers worked with several NGOs, UNICEF, USAID, The World Bank in Honduras, and private foundations in Romania. From 1994 to 1998 she worked for Holt International Children’s Services in Romania, where she also served as Country Director.

Ms. Bunkers holds a BA in Psychology with a minor in Women’s Studies from the University of Oregon and will complete a Masters in Child Rights at the University of Fribourg, Switzerland, in 2010. She has published four articles on adoption in Guatemala and is fluent in Spanish and Romanian.

 

IM000354.JPGDr. Virginia Feldman is a locum pediatrician at Kaiser Permanente in Portland, Oregon, where she was a Staff Pediatrician (1975-2004). During this period she served as Chief of Pediatrics (1989-1997), Director of the Adolescent Health Program (1986-2004), Director of the Child Abuse Assessment Center (1976-1997), and the founding member of the Kaiser Bioethics Committee (1985-2004). She is an Adjunct Professor of Pediatrics at the Oregon Health and Science University. Dr. Feldman received her undergraduate and medical degrees at the University of Michigan and is Board Certified in Pediatrics.

She volunteers as a pediatrician at the Essential Health Clinic and the Wallace Medical Concern in Oregon and for the Amigos De Las Americas National Health and Safety Committee. Dr. Feldman has worked in Liberia, El Salvador, and Ecuador and throughout India, including Maharashtra, Delhi, Kerala, and has led medical teams providing care at a NGO in Andhra Pradesh, India.

Dr. Feldman’s clinical research includes studies on smoking and pregnancy (Kaiser Research Center, 1985); domestic violence prevention in HMOs (Kaiser Research Center, 1998-2000); medical and mental health of sex workers and their children (Andhra Pradesh, India, 2006); social issues of temple prostitutes (Nandyal, India, 2006); cardiovascular health and diabetes (Muthyalapadu, Andhra Pradesh, India, 2008); training foreign community health workers in the US (Portland, OR, 2008); and prostitution rescue rates after modified microfinance loans (Andhra Pradesh, India, 2009).

 

Carrie Burgess, Programming and Outreach Advisor | Global Health PromisCarrie Burgess — Programming and Outreach Advisor

Carrie Burgess served as a United States Peace Corps volunteer in Paraguay from 2013 to 2016. In her first two years, she worked at the grassroots level as a Community Health volunteer in a rural community. She led reproductive health programming at the local schools and worked with local stakeholders to develop projects that targeted the social determinants of health in the community. In her third year with the Peace Corps, Carrie moved to the capital city, Asuncion, to work with Amnesty International and a small NGO, Tatarendy, that provides educational and health resources to female sex workers. During her time as a Project Consultant with Tatarendy, Carrie facilitated outreach efforts to provide support and contraception to over 100 women. She also managed two grants and designed projects that empowered Paraguayan youth through HIV/AIDS, sexual health and peer education workshops.

In October 2016, Carrie joined Global Health Promise and began advising an NGO in Uganda, Rhythm of Life, on programming for their newly established support group for Mothers who are Sex Workers.
Carrie holds a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan and currently lives in the Bronx, New York where she works as a Community Health Organizer for the Montefiore School-Based Health Program. Carrie is fluent in Spanish and has a passion for empowerment-based program models.

 

Katherine Hargitt, PsyD. — Advisor for Mental Health Issues | Global Health PromiseKatherine Hargitt, PsyD. — Advisor for Mental Health Issues

Katherine Hargitt, PsyD., is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist who works with trauma survivors and service providers, and specializes in the psychosocial care, recovery, and re/integration of survivors of sexual exploitation and trafficking. Katherine has been actively involved in the national and international anti-human trafficking field for more than 17 years, leading advocacy efforts and training for civil society, providing consultancy for governments and NGOs, and conducting international research. She obtained her doctorate degree at the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco, CA. Her dissertation focused on the development of a training model and curriculum outline for service providers working with children affected by sexual exploitation in the United States.

Katherine has worked as a Consultant and Lead Researcher for ECPAT International. She recently conducted a multi-country field research project focusing on the care, recovery and (re)integration needs of SEC survivors in Nepal, Thailand, and the Philippines. In 2002, she conducted an independent field research project on the psychosocial rehabilitation of SEC survivors in Cambodia, India, Nepal, Thailand and the Philippines. Katherine provided expertize to the UN Special Rapporteur on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography, for their study and report on the establishment of “Comprehensive, rights-based and child-centered care, recovery and reintegration programs”.

She is an active member of the Sonoma County Human Trafficking Task Force, a Board Member of HEAL Trafficking, and the co-chair HEAL’s Direct Services Committee and Mental Health Council. She also provides Disaster Mental Health through the
American Red Cross. She has served on MISSSEY’s board, and is currently collaborating with Blossomy Project on an Aftercare Emergency Fund for SEC survivors and their children.”

 

Dr. Diane Vines, Advisor for Nursing Issues | Global Health PromiseDr. Diane Vines — Advisor for Nursing Issues

Dr. Diane Vines, retired Dean of Nursing at Mount Saint Mary’s University, is one of the United States’ top healthcare education professionals. She has served on faculty at both the University of Portland, Boston University, and currently adjunct faculty at California State University San Bernardino. She also served in government in multiple capacities, including as director and co-founder of the National Adult Literacy Initiative with First Lady Barbara Bush.

Before coming to the Mount, Diane was dean of CSU Dominguez Hills’ School of Health; she founded the Oregon Governor’s Healthcare Workforce Initiative; served as vice chancellor and board secretary for the Oregon University System; was a White House Fellow; and was special assistant to the U. S. Secretary of Education.

Diane is a dedicated researcher with a long track record of meaningful inquiries into subjects ranging from the effectiveness of poverty simulations in changing nursing students’ attitudes towards poverty and the poor, to the effectiveness of treatments for post-trauma survivors, and to the childrearing practices of prostituted and trafficked women. She has been awarded millions of dollars in private and government grants.